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Posts Tagged ‘shower’

How big is too big when it comes to the gaps…

Chris,

You provide great information in response to questions.  I’m hoping you can help me with one I have.  We just had a frameless shower installed.  All walls are tile, the curb is solid granite.  The glass is 1/2 inch with one panel fixed on top of a half wall and the other panel is notched and joins the panel on the wall (90 degree angle) and continues down to the granite curb. It’s a large space so we didn’t need any door.  My question is about the notched panel. The tile is square edge but the notch is curved. The glass of the notch rests on the top of the half wall, but where the glass goes down the wall to the granite there is a gap of at least 1/4 inch that the installer filled with silicone. It seems too wide and way too much silicone to me.  But I’m not the expert.  Your thoughts?

Denise

Hi Denise,

Thanks for your question. How big is too big when it comes to the gaps in your frameless shower enclosure? I’m sure different people will give you different answers… In my opinion, 1/4” is borderline. Generally speaking, we aim to have 1/8” gaps between the glass and the tile. Where the hinge side of the door meets the wall a 1/4” gap is normal. You have the back plate of the hinge, which is 1/8” thick, and the additional 1/8” clearance there. The gap from glass to glass (where the strike side of the door meets the fixed panel at the vertical gap) is normally 3/16”.

It’s important to keep in mind the limitations of the fabricator and the installer. The standard tolerance for frameless shower glass is plus-or-minus 1/8”. This is the industry standard… Although an installer may aim to make all of the joints 3/16” or less, it is not always possible if the glass is not fabricated exactly to specifications. In your case, I would have to say the ¼” gap is acceptable. If it were 3/8” or more I would not be satisfied, but there is little that can be done to prevent what you are describing. After all, it is only 1/16” larger than the ideal.

I hope you find this helpful,

-Chris

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Relationship Based Services

I recently received this comment / question from a reader:

Great services that you provided for installing a new shower door. But I have one question for you. Do you service for repairing purposes?

-Sharon Reams

Thanks for your question, Sharon. We have been blessed with many, many local customers. Although we do provide repair services, we only provide these services to existing customers. As a licensed California C-17 Glazing Contractor I am able to do any type of work that falls within my area of expertise. That includes commercial as well as residential glass projects. Windows, glass doors, storefronts, handrails, aluminum panels (and other architectural metals), mirrors, painted glass panels, restroom partitions, glass office dividers, and more.

Our decision to specialize in shower doors and enclosures has been a good one. It has allowed us to become very proficient in providing very high quality products, and to turn them around quickly. As a result, we have become the undisputed champions in shower enclosure design, manufacture, and installation in the Santa Cruz County area. We have customers with multiple homes in the area that we have been working with for many years.  That is not to mention the many quality general contractors and home builders that we work with on a regular basis.

We are more interested in the relationship we have with our customers than the specific work that we do for them. Once we are doing business with a customer, we are available to do whatever is needed to meet all of their glass project needs. We are in this for the long haul, and building relationships with our customers has been the number one secret to our success so far. We offer an online frameless shower enclosure quote to anyone who is interested, free of charge. Just follow this link: http://showcaseshowerdoor.com/quote-request/

 

Silicone as a Glass Bonding Agent

Hi Chris,

Our frameless L shaped shower has a glass brace fitted above the section which has the door. They have attached this to the glass uprights with silicon. Is this strong enough or are you supposed to use a glass bonding agent?

Best wishes,

Mike and Gail

glue-01 glue-02

Dear Mike and Gail,

Silicone is actually one of the best bonding agents available for glass. It is used in many commercial applications where it is the primary structural fastener in those systems. The ability of silicone to stretch and compress makes it the ideal sealant and adhesive for glass. We all know that glass is unforgiving in nature. It doesn’t want to bend, stretch, or compress. Silicone helps to make up for this.

The down side to using silicone as an adhesive is that it takes a long time to cure (about 24 hours). It’s also a bit messy to work with, and not very easy to clean up. If I need to glue something in a hurry, I will use a different adhesive, but I prefer silicone to anything else. I don’t think you have anything to worry about.

Have a great day!

-Chris

http://www.ShowcaseShowerDoor.com

Shower Glass De-lamination

Hello,

Your help with this issue could save me a lot of time and money.

We remodeled our bathroom over a year ago and had a frameless glass shower unit installed.

Following the installers advise, we applied Rain-X to the glass before using the unit. Over a short period of time, we noticed a checker-board pattern appear between the double pane glass when using a hot water shower. This progressed with the appearance of water spots between the panes. We reported the problem to the installer and they came and replaced the glass partitions. The installer told us this time to use glass cleaner containing Rain-X before using the shower, which I did. Within a short period of time the same issue returned. The installer instructed us to use a buffing pad to remove the spots. That didn’t work so I wanted to completely rule out hard water spots on the surface of the glass and cleaned with a lemon juice- vinegar/baking soda-vinegar/water protocol. The surface of the glass sparkled but did not remove the water spots.

I believe this to be material and/or installation defect that allowed moisture to collect between the double pane glass resulting in the checker-board appearance following a hot shower and the subsequent appearance of water spots, none of which is on the surface. Unfortunately, we may have waited too long for another warranty replacement while pursuing installer recommendations to remove ” hard water spots”. Bottom line,something has to be done as it is getting worse.

How do you suggest we proceed and how do we prevent this from occurring again on the next glass replacement?

HELP!!!

Rob Hailes

glass delamination glass delamination

Hi Rob,

Laminated glass is basically two pieces of glass that are laminated together with clear plastic. It is impossible to tell this by looking straight through the glass with the naked eye. This is the type of glass that is used in the windshield of your car. It is a type of safety glass, and meets code for showers (unless the local authority having jurisdiction says otherwise).

The problem is that the manufacturer and supplier of the glass will not give you a warranty for use in a shower enclosure. The edges of the laminated glass need to be protected from being exposed to water directly, like in the case of a frameless shower enclosure. These panels will normally work out fine when the edges are captured (framed), but when the edges are exposed they are vulnerable to what is known as “delamination.” The glass begins to pull away from the plastic lamination and vice-versa.

Without seeing your glass, that is what I am guessing is happening in your situation. The solution is to replace the laminated glass with tempered.

I hope this helps,

-Chris

RE: Glass Shower Doors and Surface Treatments

Hello,

I happened upon your blog and am very impressed with the wealth of information there!

I just had a new shower enclosure (corner) put in, and am wondering whether it is necessary to treat the glass with some kind of sealant. The prior glass would get cloudy pretty quickly (I’m not sure whether our water is “hard”, or it was soap residue) and I found myself cleaning it every week, which was sometimes difficult to do since the only way I could get it really clean was to use a scour pad (non-scratch, of course!).

I saw on your blog that you recommend the “Liquid Diamond” product, but am not sure which one to order for my needs. Can you help? And, can you tell me whether this product needs to be reapplied, or how it is maintained?

Thank you so much for your time! (I am located in New York City).

Miriam

 

Hi Miriam,

It’s a good idea to use some type of product to protect your shower glass. Nothing will prevent water spots from forming on glass, but you can prevent water stains from ruining your shower door. There are a couple of different options available. You can purchase “Rain-X” or a similar product and apply it yourself. My experience is that this type of product needs to be reapplied every few months. The great thing about the Liquid Diamonds product from Diamond Seal Systems is that it doesn’t require regular applications. The maintenance is pretty simple, and primarily consists of refraining from using harsh cleaners. If properly cared for, the Diamond Seal treatment will never need to be reapplied. There is probably a certified installer in your area.

Thanks for reading the blog,

Chris Phillips – Owner

Showcase Shower Door – CCL #957120
1970 17th Avenue #C – Santa Cruz, CA 95062
Phone: (831) 464-3899 – FAX: (831) 477-0760

http://www.ShowcaseShowerDoor.com

No Weep Holes?

Hi, Chris.

We had one of our baths redone a few years ago but the apartment has been empty ever since as we were away from the country. A the time,  a frameless door was installed and we never thought about looking for weep holes on the track until now that we found your blog. The shower has never been used so we don’t know if water would collect on the track.

Our question: Is there such a thing as a shower door track without weep holes? The photos show –instead of a conventional channel– a sloped, low lip on the side of the pan with no room for holes even if we wanted to drill some. Our guess was that, with this type of slanted lip, weep holes are not needed as water will just slide down onto the pan. We also checked if the track has been installed with the wrong side facing the pan but we failed to find weep holes on the other side as well.

Your clarification will be greatly appreciated. All the best to you.

Diana

 

21

 

Hi Diana,

Great question! Actually, this type of shower enclosure doesn’t require holes in the frame in order for the water to weep. The “L” shape of the bottom sill allows the water to run off back into the shower. As a rule, the sill is caulked on the outside only, or the inside is only partially caulked. This allows water the finds its way under the sill to escape, or at least dry out over time.

Thanks for reading the blog!

-Chris

Using concrete anchors in shower door installations

Hey Chris,

Found your blog online – perhaps you can help… We’re looking into getting a frameless 36″ shower door (67-68″ high), because we dislike the look of a panel. We have one company telling us they can do it with hinges that hold up to 110 lbs, no stud needed, another saying they’ll only do it if there is a stud where the door goes in, and a third saying they just won’t do it. Who is right on this one?  The ones who said they don’t need studs calculated the weight of the door to be 85 lbs.

Thanks!

Tal

Image

Hi Tal,

It is always good to have a stud to anchor into… that rarely happens, though… There are a number of different types of anchors that can be used in a tile wall to secure the hinges properly, providing there is something solid behind the tile. Cement board (also known as HardieBacker or DUROCK) will easily support the weight of your shower door. It is just a matter of using the proper screws and anchors. We generally use #10 screws (the ones supplied by the hinge manufacturer) and concrete anchors. I haven’t had an issue with this combination in any of the shower enclosures that I have installed.

Thanks for writing,

-Chris

Showcase Shower Door – CCL #957120
1970 17th Avenue #C – Santa Cruz, CA 95062
Phone: (831) 464-3899 – FAX: (831) 477-0760

http://www.ShowcaseShowerDoor.com