Archive

Posts Tagged ‘shower door’

Buying Shower Doors and Enclosures Online

More and more people are shopping online these days. It is a convenient way to shop for a lot of different items. People even buy shower doors online, if you can believe it! There are a lot of options available, and some are actually quite good. Showcase Shower Door Company carries a full line of shower doors and enclosures manufactured by Fleurco. They are some of the finest shower enclosures you will find anywhere. We can offer our customers a complete package including the shower pan, glass, hardware, and instructions. All of this delivered right to your front door!

There is the challenge, however, of getting your shower enclosure installed once it arrives. We offer the service of installing customer-supplied shower enclosures for people in our area, whether they buy it from us or not. Wherever it is that you live, there is a good chance that there is a qualified shower enclosure installer available in your area. We here at Showcase Shower Door Company are taking steps to put together a network of quality shower door installers in different parts of the United States. We hope to be able to refer these experts to people who need their services. This will also allow shower enclosure manufacturers who sell their products across the country to take advantage of the skills of qualified installers in every area. Anyway, it’s something we are working on, and I’ll let you know as things develop.

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Silicone as a Glass Bonding Agent

Hi Chris,

Our frameless L shaped shower has a glass brace fitted above the section which has the door. They have attached this to the glass uprights with silicon. Is this strong enough or are you supposed to use a glass bonding agent?

Best wishes,

Mike and Gail

glue-01 glue-02

Dear Mike and Gail,

Silicone is actually one of the best bonding agents available for glass. It is used in many commercial applications where it is the primary structural fastener in those systems. The ability of silicone to stretch and compress makes it the ideal sealant and adhesive for glass. We all know that glass is unforgiving in nature. It doesn’t want to bend, stretch, or compress. Silicone helps to make up for this.

The down side to using silicone as an adhesive is that it takes a long time to cure (about 24 hours). It’s also a bit messy to work with, and not very easy to clean up. If I need to glue something in a hurry, I will use a different adhesive, but I prefer silicone to anything else. I don’t think you have anything to worry about.

Have a great day!

-Chris

http://www.ShowcaseShowerDoor.com

Sagging Framed Shower Door – Can it Be Repaired?

Dear Chris.

My shower door is sagging and the gap at the top of the door is wider than the gap at the bottom of the door.  There is also some black plastic coming out of the hinge area of the piano hinge on the shower door. Can I just replace the hinge or do I need a new shower door?

Thanks,

Don

framed-02     framed-01

Hi Don,

The type of shower door you are describing is what I call a “manufactured” shower door. These are also known as “standard” shower doors. They have a gasket that runs the entire length (height) of the glass, and the panel is held in place by friction. On the inside of the door there are usually a few screws that are tightened down to cause the aluminum assembly to clamp down on the glass, holding it in place.

Over time, the glass may begin to slip out of the channel that it is being held by. The most common cause of this is people hanging their wet towels (bath mats) over the door to dry. These doors just aren’t designed to hold any extra weight at all. Once the door starts to fail, there is no amount of tightening the screws that is going to hold the glass in place any more. In short, you really do need a new door.

That being said, I have had success in the past with taking the door apart, cleaning out the aluminum very carefully, and replacing the rubber gasket with silicone (wet silicone out of a caulk tube). The silicone was able to hold the glass even though the vinyl gasket had failed. It is quite a bit of work, and you will have to gauge whether or not it is worth the effort.

Thanks for writing!

-Chris

http://showcaseshowerdoor.com/

Adhesive to Retrofit Shower Door Handle to Glass Shower Door

Online I came across a post from Chris about new adhesives that work great to adhere metal shower handles to a glass shower door.  Can you recommend any specific product names?  I’ve seen some sites that suggest rear-view mirror adhesives such as J-B Weld.  Might those work?

Thanks.

Skip in Dallas

Adhesive for glass

Adhesive for glass

Hi Skip,

Yes, I think the adhesives you are talking about may work just fine. Over the years, I have tried a number of different ones, with differing levels of success. The truth is, I have had the least success with the ones that are supposed to work the best. These are the UV (ultraviolet light) cure adhesives for glass and metal.

I have had the best results using two-part epoxies. The challenging thing about using them is that they are pretty runny, and are hard to work with on a vertical surface. I recently gave this “STIK’N SEAL” adhesive a try… It’s made by Locktite, and it works great! It is also pretty viscous, so it is a bit easier to work with on a door that is already installed. The shower is a pretty wet environment, so you want something that can hold up to extreme conditions as well.

Give it a try!

-Chris

http://www.ShowcaseShowerDoor.com

Shower Glass De-lamination

Hello,

Your help with this issue could save me a lot of time and money.

We remodeled our bathroom over a year ago and had a frameless glass shower unit installed.

Following the installers advise, we applied Rain-X to the glass before using the unit. Over a short period of time, we noticed a checker-board pattern appear between the double pane glass when using a hot water shower. This progressed with the appearance of water spots between the panes. We reported the problem to the installer and they came and replaced the glass partitions. The installer told us this time to use glass cleaner containing Rain-X before using the shower, which I did. Within a short period of time the same issue returned. The installer instructed us to use a buffing pad to remove the spots. That didn’t work so I wanted to completely rule out hard water spots on the surface of the glass and cleaned with a lemon juice- vinegar/baking soda-vinegar/water protocol. The surface of the glass sparkled but did not remove the water spots.

I believe this to be material and/or installation defect that allowed moisture to collect between the double pane glass resulting in the checker-board appearance following a hot shower and the subsequent appearance of water spots, none of which is on the surface. Unfortunately, we may have waited too long for another warranty replacement while pursuing installer recommendations to remove ” hard water spots”. Bottom line,something has to be done as it is getting worse.

How do you suggest we proceed and how do we prevent this from occurring again on the next glass replacement?

HELP!!!

Rob Hailes

glass delamination glass delamination

Hi Rob,

Laminated glass is basically two pieces of glass that are laminated together with clear plastic. It is impossible to tell this by looking straight through the glass with the naked eye. This is the type of glass that is used in the windshield of your car. It is a type of safety glass, and meets code for showers (unless the local authority having jurisdiction says otherwise).

The problem is that the manufacturer and supplier of the glass will not give you a warranty for use in a shower enclosure. The edges of the laminated glass need to be protected from being exposed to water directly, like in the case of a frameless shower enclosure. These panels will normally work out fine when the edges are captured (framed), but when the edges are exposed they are vulnerable to what is known as “delamination.” The glass begins to pull away from the plastic lamination and vice-versa.

Without seeing your glass, that is what I am guessing is happening in your situation. The solution is to replace the laminated glass with tempered.

I hope this helps,

-Chris

A problem-solver’s dream job

I LOVE shower doors. This business is such a great source of challenges and opportunities to be creative. This weekend, I was able to complete the installation of a very nice heavy glass steam shower enclosure in Santa Cruz.

20130609-080001.jpg        20130609-204329.jpg

The project turned out very nice, and I’m really pleased with the result. There were, however, a few real challenges involved. The enclosure is floor to ceiling, and the shower is “curb-less” so there is very little room to work. Add to that the fact that the bathroom is very small, all of the walls, ceiling, and floor are out of square… There are a whole series of challenges right from the start.

The layout part of every project is the most critical part. Every measurement must be precise, and every outage in plumb and level needs to be accounted for. This particular enclosure required a number of exposed notches. Not only did we need to notch around the bench, there were additional notches required for a bullnose and accent tiles. The largest piece of glass is the fixed panel on the right.