Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Glass’

Splash Wall Leakage

A recent visitor sent me this video, illustrating his shower enclosure issue:

…and this was my response:

Hi Bill,

Here is the best solution, in my opinion, for both sides of your door. The part number is SDTWT2 and the manufacturer is CR Laurence. You can get these from your local glass shop. If they don’t have them in stock, they can order them from you. CRL is the largest supplier of glass industry products, and absolutely every person in the glass business has an account with them.

The seals come with pre-applied VHB tape, so they are really easy to use. Just get the glass really clean (I like to use denatured alcohol) – peel the tape and apply. You will probably need to change these every two or three years.

I hope this is helpful, and good luck!

-Chris

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Relationship Based Services

I recently received this comment / question from a reader:

Great services that you provided for installing a new shower door. But I have one question for you. Do you service for repairing purposes?

-Sharon Reams

Thanks for your question, Sharon. We have been blessed with many, many local customers. Although we do provide repair services, we only provide these services to existing customers. As a licensed California C-17 Glazing Contractor I am able to do any type of work that falls within my area of expertise. That includes commercial as well as residential glass projects. Windows, glass doors, storefronts, handrails, aluminum panels (and other architectural metals), mirrors, painted glass panels, restroom partitions, glass office dividers, and more.

Our decision to specialize in shower doors and enclosures has been a good one. It has allowed us to become very proficient in providing very high quality products, and to turn them around quickly. As a result, we have become the undisputed champions in shower enclosure design, manufacture, and installation in the Santa Cruz County area. We have customers with multiple homes in the area that we have been working with for many years.  That is not to mention the many quality general contractors and home builders that we work with on a regular basis.

We are more interested in the relationship we have with our customers than the specific work that we do for them. Once we are doing business with a customer, we are available to do whatever is needed to meet all of their glass project needs. We are in this for the long haul, and building relationships with our customers has been the number one secret to our success so far. We offer an online frameless shower enclosure quote to anyone who is interested, free of charge. Just follow this link: http://showcaseshowerdoor.com/quote-request/

 

Painted Glass for Back Splashes

We have been receiving more calls recently for information about painted glass for kitchen and bathroom back splashes. People have been using custom pained glass for walls, cabinets, doors, and even floors on the east coast for a long time. It seems to be catching on here on the west coast as well. Of course, we at Showcase Shower Door Company have been installing painted glass for our customers for years. We have a large selection of colors, and can even match customer supplied samples.

Glass is a great solution when tile or granite is less desirable. Glass offers a surface that is non-porous and easily sanitized. There are no grout lines to keep clean, and there are no limits to the colors that are available. There are different thicknesses, options for regular clear or low-iron glass, the option of tempering, textures, etc. If you have any questions or just want more information about painted glass for back-splashes, just let me know. I would be happy to provide any help that I can.

-Chris

Silicone as a Glass Bonding Agent

Hi Chris,

Our frameless L shaped shower has a glass brace fitted above the section which has the door. They have attached this to the glass uprights with silicon. Is this strong enough or are you supposed to use a glass bonding agent?

Best wishes,

Mike and Gail

glue-01 glue-02

Dear Mike and Gail,

Silicone is actually one of the best bonding agents available for glass. It is used in many commercial applications where it is the primary structural fastener in those systems. The ability of silicone to stretch and compress makes it the ideal sealant and adhesive for glass. We all know that glass is unforgiving in nature. It doesn’t want to bend, stretch, or compress. Silicone helps to make up for this.

The down side to using silicone as an adhesive is that it takes a long time to cure (about 24 hours). It’s also a bit messy to work with, and not very easy to clean up. If I need to glue something in a hurry, I will use a different adhesive, but I prefer silicone to anything else. I don’t think you have anything to worry about.

Have a great day!

-Chris

http://www.ShowcaseShowerDoor.com

Shower Glass De-lamination

Hello,

Your help with this issue could save me a lot of time and money.

We remodeled our bathroom over a year ago and had a frameless glass shower unit installed.

Following the installers advise, we applied Rain-X to the glass before using the unit. Over a short period of time, we noticed a checker-board pattern appear between the double pane glass when using a hot water shower. This progressed with the appearance of water spots between the panes. We reported the problem to the installer and they came and replaced the glass partitions. The installer told us this time to use glass cleaner containing Rain-X before using the shower, which I did. Within a short period of time the same issue returned. The installer instructed us to use a buffing pad to remove the spots. That didn’t work so I wanted to completely rule out hard water spots on the surface of the glass and cleaned with a lemon juice- vinegar/baking soda-vinegar/water protocol. The surface of the glass sparkled but did not remove the water spots.

I believe this to be material and/or installation defect that allowed moisture to collect between the double pane glass resulting in the checker-board appearance following a hot shower and the subsequent appearance of water spots, none of which is on the surface. Unfortunately, we may have waited too long for another warranty replacement while pursuing installer recommendations to remove ” hard water spots”. Bottom line,something has to be done as it is getting worse.

How do you suggest we proceed and how do we prevent this from occurring again on the next glass replacement?

HELP!!!

Rob Hailes

glass delamination glass delamination

Hi Rob,

Laminated glass is basically two pieces of glass that are laminated together with clear plastic. It is impossible to tell this by looking straight through the glass with the naked eye. This is the type of glass that is used in the windshield of your car. It is a type of safety glass, and meets code for showers (unless the local authority having jurisdiction says otherwise).

The problem is that the manufacturer and supplier of the glass will not give you a warranty for use in a shower enclosure. The edges of the laminated glass need to be protected from being exposed to water directly, like in the case of a frameless shower enclosure. These panels will normally work out fine when the edges are captured (framed), but when the edges are exposed they are vulnerable to what is known as “delamination.” The glass begins to pull away from the plastic lamination and vice-versa.

Without seeing your glass, that is what I am guessing is happening in your situation. The solution is to replace the laminated glass with tempered.

I hope this helps,

-Chris

A problem-solver’s dream job

I LOVE shower doors. This business is such a great source of challenges and opportunities to be creative. This weekend, I was able to complete the installation of a very nice heavy glass steam shower enclosure in Santa Cruz.

20130609-080001.jpg        20130609-204329.jpg

The project turned out very nice, and I’m really pleased with the result. There were, however, a few real challenges involved. The enclosure is floor to ceiling, and the shower is “curb-less” so there is very little room to work. Add to that the fact that the bathroom is very small, all of the walls, ceiling, and floor are out of square… There are a whole series of challenges right from the start.

The layout part of every project is the most critical part. Every measurement must be precise, and every outage in plumb and level needs to be accounted for. This particular enclosure required a number of exposed notches. Not only did we need to notch around the bench, there were additional notches required for a bullnose and accent tiles. The largest piece of glass is the fixed panel on the right.