Archive

Posts Tagged ‘fast installation’

Installing Customer-Supplied Shower Enclosures

We get calls from people who have purchased shower enclosures online and are looking for qualified technicians to install them. In the past, we have made it our policy to avoid installing customer-supplied shower door kits. There are so many different types of enclosures made by various companies… We have found it to be a good idea to just avoid the pitfalls of getting involved with installing them. We have vendors who can supply any type of enclosure that we are not able to manufacture ourselves, so it has made sense to us to install only the doors and enclosures the we sell.

Recently, glass barn door style shower enclosures have become very popular. I first became familiar with these types of enclosures when Cardinal came out with the “Skyline” series enclosure. This was the first frameless sliding enclosure of that type (to the best of my knowledge). It wasn’t long before other manufacturers began to make similar products. It took a while, however, to find any that matched the quality of the Cardinal version.

Today, they are common, and are likely all being made at the same factory overseas… We have started to take orders to install enclosures for people who have purchased them elsewhere, having become so familiar with them. There are other, even more innovative frameless sliding shower enclosures that have come on the market. One such product is the “Essence” series enclosure from C. R. Laurence. It utilizes 1/2″ tempered glass, and has no cross bar at all. This enclosure has become my favorite sliding shower door to install. It’s AWESOME!

For more information, feel free to get in touch.

-Chris

http://www.ShowcaseShowerDoor.com

We Fix Botched Shower Door Installations


We were recently contacted by a gentleman who had a shower enclosure installed in a neighboring community (Santa Clara).The job went terribly wrong, and he needed some help. He was looking for advice about what to do about the poor glass fitting and bad caulking job done by the previous glass contractor. My advice to him was to have the original contractor come back and clean up the mess.



After a couple of weeks, he contacted me again and told me that he wanted me to come and redo the installation for him. Apparently, he was tired of dealing with the existing contractor, and just wanted it to be finished. Although I don’t normally do work in that area, I agreed to come out and see what I could do for him.



The silicone used by the other shower door installer had gone bad, and hadn’t really adhered to the tile anyway. I’m happy to say that we were able to take out the glass, and reinstall the enclosure using parts that the previous contractor had provided. It feels good to be able to make a bad installation turn out right.

Check out our website at showcaseshowerdoor.com

Installing Customer-Supplied Shower Enclosures

From time to time I am contacted by a potential customer who has purchased a shower door or enclosure elsewhere. They have found a “great deal” on a shower door online, or at a local home improvement center. Now they need to find someone who knows how to install it for them. My policy is never to install a customer-supplied shower door. There are just too many things that can go wrong. Online suppliers and home improvement stores are there to sell shower doors to people who are capable of installing them. It’s just common sense that, if you don’t know how to install a shower door, you probably aren’t qualified to buy the right one in the first place. Chances are that the customer thinks they are going to save a little money by buying the materials from one store, and having it installed by someone else. This is a big mistake. A customer who is looking for the cheapest way to do something is a disaster waiting to happen!

20131117-084618.jpg

I have been doing business with a number of different suppliers for many years. There are a lot of great products available from local manufacturers. On the other hand, there is a lot of cheap crap that is made in China. Odds are that the guy who has done a Google search for “the cheapest shower door on planet Earth” hasn’t come up with a very high quality enclosure. I learned early on that it was a really bad idea to get involved in partnering with people who want to go this route. There are few things less enjoyable then being in a stranger’s bathroom with a shower door kit from some far-off land… hundreds of little parts that are made of inferior metals (or plastic instead of metal!) Instructions that were written by someone who obviously doesn’t speak English, and having the materials crumble under the smallest amount of pressure. Great! Not only have I wasted my day trying to install this piece of junk, now I look incompetent, and have to buy this guy a new crappy shower door and try to get out of this mess! No thank you!
20131117-084906.jpg

Recently, I let a customer talk me into installing his shower door (bought online). I told him that “I don’t install customer-supplied shower doors.” But he was such a nice guy, and practically begged me to do it. I have a soft spot for people who are in need, and it’s hard for me to say “no.” It had been years since I had agreed to install one of these things, and had forgotten what a nightmare it was to do this. I explained that it was going to be expensive. I went over the price with him a few times to me absolutely sure he understood how much it would cost. To make a long story short, after installing the shower door, the guy didn’t want to pay me. Go figure! It was just what I needed to remind me that my policy is a good one. Never install a customer-supplied shower enclosure.

Frameless Shower Enclosures for Bathtubs

These days there are more and more people requesting frameless heavy glass enclosures for their bathtub showers. Several years ago, people began asking if this was a possibility… today, this is pretty common. There are newer innovations that incorporate sliding glass panels with heavy glass enclosures that are suitable for bathtubs. Among these are the “Skyline” series enclosure by Cardinal, and the “Serenity” series by CRL. The latest sliding frameless enclosure is called the “Essence” series enclosure. Click this link – http://youtu.be/EmSJPjmRGBI – to check it out.

Image          Image

The enclosures shown in the photos above were designed, manufactured, and installed by Showcase Shower Door. These enclosures are designed according to customer specifications, and include Diamond Seal treatment as a standard feature. Diamond Seal helps to prevent water spotting, and protects glass from the permanent damage that hard water can cause over time. If you need help with ideas for your tub enclosure, or just have questions, give me a call any time at (831) 464-3899.

Video Testimonial – Ross Taylor in Soquel, CA

Another video testimonial from yet another satisfied Showcase Shower Door customer. This one is in the hills of Soquel, California. The enclosure is a 1/2″ frameless neo-angle shower enclosure. Thanks Ross!

Adding New Aluminum to an Old Shower Enclosure

Read your blog and hope that you can help. My husband and I are HOPING to retire next year and want to “freshen up” our house a bit before we put it on the market in the spring. I have searched the web extensively, but can’t seem to find out if it is possible to order metal strips to replace the existing SHINY GOLD frame on our shower enclosure — as opposed to replacing the entire structure, which costs major $$$. Do you have a resource for purchasing replacement frame strips????

Trina & Ted Williams
Franklin, TN

    

Dear Trina and Ted,

This is actually a fairly common question. Customers ask me pretty frequently if it is possible to reuse the glass from a shower enclosure and replace just the aluminum. Of course, the glass lasts virtually forever, while the aluminum framework starts to break-down after about ten years or so. People are usually pretty surprised to learn that the aluminum frame on the shower enclosure is actually the most expensive part. There is too much work involved to disassemble the enclosure and reassemble it using the old glass and new aluminum. There is no chance of saving any money by doing this.

It is possible, however, to install new aluminum strips over the old metal. In the glass industry this is known as “cladding.” The finish you are looking for (bright gold) is available in a couple of different sizes. The first is a 5/8″ wide strip with a beveled edge on one side. The second is a 1″ extrusion that is “L” shaped. A combination of these two shapes should be satisfactory to clad an existing manufactured shower enclosure. The aluminum strips are actually designed for use in the installation of mirrors, and come in 12′ lengths.

Now, hiring a glazier to come out and do the cladding would end up costing at least as much as the enclosure is worth. It is possible to do it yourself more affordably, though. You can purchase these parts from Showcase Shower Door. I will be happy to give some instructions on what you will need and how to do the work.

Happy New Year!

-Chris

Do it Yourself?

Hi, Chris.

My father is 86 years old and of the generation that fixes the old instead of buying the new. He has torn apart a framed door with fixed glass panel on a 30 year old shower in his house. As we expected, he is having a hard time finding a silicone tubing drip seal for this door. Are they not available anymore? Or will he be forced to cave in to buying a brand new door for this shower, probably also needing to be custom sized for width?

Thanks for a quick response, because the shower can’t be used now that he has hastily torn it apart, thinking he would easily find replacement parts!

Hi Karen,

There are so many different manufacturers of shower doors that it would be really hard to tell you where to start looking for parts. If the door is 20 or 30 years old, there is no chance that the same parts are still available. There is also a good possibility that the glass in the door doesn’t meet modern building safety codes either. I’m guessing that what you are talking about when you say “silicone tubing drip seal” is the rubber gasket that goes in the aluminum channel between the glass and metal. There are a lot of types of gasket (and I mean A LOT!) and it would probably be possible to find something that would work, if you had a good supplier of gaskets (a local glass shop?) and a lot of time to spend sorting through them.

If your dad is dead-set on doing this himself, I would suggest using a tube of silicone sealant from the hardware store. He could use a caulk gun to pump the silicone into the aluminum channels, assemble the door around the glass, and wait 24 hours for it to set up before reinstalling it. It probably won’t look that great, but I’m guessing that your dad’s 30-year-old shower door isn’t very beautiful anyway. I always advise people that it’s not worth their time to try to fix their own shower doors. A professional can do it so much faster and more efficiently. On the other hand, if your dad doesn’t really have anything else to do, and no-one gets hurt in the process, what the heck! There’s nothing like a good challenge.

Thanks for writing,

-Chris